This is New Zealand?

What the critics said.

 

"Then the curtains swing back to reveal three screens which cover a 60ft width, as compared with an average 24ft screen, and the 20 minute documentary This is New Zealand is underway.

 

“Three projectors throw separate 35mm images onto each screen, giving the impact of Cinerama with the added advantage of showing the main scene with two supplementary ones which blend, divide and mix, to shatter the senses with quite unparalleled views of New Zealand and her people. Devastating is one word for it....”

 

Fiona Kidman, Rotorua Daily Post, 23 April 1971

 

"Much the best film I have seen this month has been This is New Zealand – astonishing for its technical brilliance, taste and ability to move the most cynical of New Zealanders. It is really a sensual experience. One is literally carried away – by an airborne cameraman – zooming in over magnificent mountains and farmlands, held up by nothing but Sibelius … The sound track has a soft echoing clarity that makes a duck's beak in water and a honey-gathering bee seem another kind of music. If for no other reason than the talent behind the film, I emerged feeling quite proud of my country.”

 

Marilyn Duckworth, Public Service Journal, June 1971

 

This is New Zealand is the most successful film of its kind in the world. Four years ago National Film Unit technicians said it was impossible. They looked at Geoffrey Scott's original treatment in the summer of 1967 and said 'It won't work. You'll never get it done.' Thousands of screenings later, This is New Zealand made cinema history as the first film to recover production costs during a premiere session at one theatre.”

 

Stephen Sisson, Evening Post, 19 June 1971

 

“The whole presents a kaleidoscopic view of New Zealand which would spare the blushes of the most sophisticated New Zealander viewing it among an audience of the alien and uninitiated. And the number of publicity films of which that can be said could be listed on the back of a postage stamp in capital letters.”

 

Iain Macdonald, NZ Herald, 14 November 1971